Happy Camper


There’s nothing like a trip to the great outdoors to put you in good spirits! With nature all around you, fresh air, greenery, and wildlife is abundant. No matter what the season, the environment is harsh if you do not have the right tools. Amongst the most important tools to bring with you on a camping trip is a camp knife. In fact, some people bring a variety of knives such as a camp knife, hatchet, fish fillet knife, multi-tool, and a mid-size survival knife.

A decent camp knife is usually an all-in-one versatile knife with extreme durability. Camp knives generally have a blade at least 5 inches in length and can have a full-tang or hidden-tang handle. Campsites are dirty and you can imagine how grimy and dull a knife will get after repeated usage. I strongly recommend packing a pocket sharpening tool (I like Work Sharp Guided Field Sharpener) for proper blade sharpening on the go!

Camp knives can be used for batoning (splitting wood), cut tender, prepare food, notch poles, and other common camp-oriented tasks. Ergonomics are very important in the wilderness, so it’s vital to make sure that the knife you are purchasing is comfortable for your hand. Features like jimping (little groove cutouts for the thumb on the back of the blade) can provide increased control. Serrations are another factor to take into consideration; knives can be partially or completely serrated. Although they can be used like a saw to gradually slice through thick objects, the cuts are less clean than plain edge knives. Knives with partial or full serration are also more difficult to sharpen than plain edge blades. Blade HQ experts provide a review of some popular camping knives.

Camp knives demonstrate more strength during big tasks versus their smaller pocket knife counterparts. They are usually fixed blades, but can also be folders with more robust construction. Liner lock knives are not recommended for activities such as batoning as they usually buckle up and can injure the user. Also, just because it’s a burly camp knife doesn’t mean it can’t be pretty. I prefer a plain edge with mirror polish or stonewash finish. Knives can be easily stored in a leather or kydex sheath that attaches either on your belt loop or the side pouch of your backpack.

Thank you for reading this camping knife blog post and please let me know what kinds of knives you take camping in the comments below! If you like this content, please don’t forget to subscribe.

Kammi

Camp knives from John’s collection.
Photo Credit: Kammi Dingman

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